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About Myron Levin

Myron Levin is an award-winning journalist, formally with the Los Angeles Times and now the chief editor of FairWarning Inc.
Recent Stories

Report Card for the States Rates Those with Best and Worst Laws to Cut Traffic Deaths

Drunk drivers, motorcyclists and young or distracted motorists make up the majority of those involved in fatal vehicle crashes, and many states are failing to pass key safety measures that could prevent such deaths, according to a new report by a highway safety group.

Consumer Protection

Counterfeits Hit Home: Consumers Are Being Foiled by Fake Water Filters

Despite the efforts of Customs and Border Protection agents, counterfeiters are passing off ineffective refrigerator water filters to many thousands of consumers, who think they are buying the real thing. The fakes may not only be useless, but unsafe. Along with failing to do what they claim, counterfeits can introduce chemicals such as arsenic and octane, a petroleum-derived solvent, into users’ drinking water.

Labor

Boxed In: Dollar Tree, the Giant Discount Chain, Cited for Job Safety Violations at Dozens of Stores

Run-ins with job safety regulators are routine for Dollar Tree, the huge discount retail chain. A FairWarning investigation found that more than 150 company stores have been cited for safety violations since December 2015, despite a settlement with OSHA in which Dollar Tree agreed to pay $825,000 in penalties and clean up its act.

Recent Stories

Air War: A Relentless Whistleblower Once More Girds for Battle Over Aviation Safety

To his supporters, former air marshal Robert MacLean personifies the best traits of whistleblowers, determined to expose the government's dirty laundry, even at high personal cost. To critics, he's an obsessive and even vindictive ex-federal employee who overstepped his bounds. Now he's battling over the need for secondary barriers to keep would-be intruders from reaching the cockpit.

Consumer Protection

What’s in a Name? Ghostly Spirits, Spinning Science to Sell Drugs, Stalk the Medical Literature

Court proceedings, investigations and whistleblower accounts have revealed a long history of drug companies manipulating the literature to promote their drugs or disparage rival products--with the aim of getting doctors to prescribe more of their meds.

Transportation Safety

In Echo of a Notorious Safety Scandal, Toyota Has Settled Hundreds of Sudden Acceleration Cases

Without admitting liability, Toyota since 2014 has quietly settled 537 lawsuits blaming sudden unintended acceleration for crashes that caused deaths or serious injuries. Automotive safety advocates see the complaints as a sign that Toyota and federal regulators failed to properly address the root of the problem when they had the opportunity years earlier.

Public Health

Bugs, Mold and Unwashed Hands: Rampant Safety Violations in Nursing Home Kitchens Endanger Residents

A FairWarning investigation found serious food safety problems in nursing homes and assisted living centers nationwide.

Consumer Protection

Star Safety Ratings, Long Helpful to Car Buyers, Now Languish in the Breakdown Lane

Grade inflation in school makes it difficult to distinguish who is actually achieving in the classroom. The federal government’s vehicle safety rating system suffers the same problem. Today, 98 percent of all vehicles tested receive four or five stars for crashworthiness. Consumer advocates and safety experts say it’s time to raise the bar for the New Car Assessment Program, which hasn’t been updated in nearly 10 years.

Consumer Protection

The Breath Test: Consumers Pop Air Monitors in Their Shopping Carts, But Do They Really Work?

For a huge swath of Northern California, the air suddenly became hazardous last November. Thick smoke from the most destructive wildfire in state history was delivering a secondary blow to nearly ten million Californians.

Consumer Protection

Alcohol Causes Cancer. Should There Be a Warning Label on Bottles and Cans?

There's a broad scientific consensus that alcohol is a carcinogen. Now some advocates want alcoholic beverages to come with cancer warning labels.