Ben Kelley

GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra testifies during a House Energy and Commerce hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington April 1, 2014. Congress is trying to establish who is to blame for at least 13 auto-related deaths over the past decade, as public hearings are held over two days on General Motors Co's slow response to defective ignition switches in cars.

Like Them or Hate Them, Injury Lawsuits Sometimes Expose Health and Safety Hazards

The scandal over General Motors’ concealment for more than a decade of dangerously defective ignition switches in some of its cars highlights an often-overlooked fact: Injury lawsuits sometimes reveal health and safety hazards that would otherwise remain secret. As Ben Kelley notes, the deadly ignition defects were not exposed by engineers for GM or the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, but by an engineer for plaintiffs in a wrongful-death suit.

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Gun, Road Safety Veer in Different Directions

Vehicle crashes have long been the leading cause of violent death in America. That dubious distinction may soon belong to gunshot deaths.

iStockphoto

School Bus Safety is Stuck in Idle

Federal transportation officials are sending a mixed message to kids by urging them to buckle up when they ride in cars, but refusing to require safety belts in school buses.

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Campaign Aimed at Hazardous Rental Cars Shifts into High Gear

A sweeping federal legislative proposal aims to ensure the safety of millions of rental car customers by getting recalled but unrepaired vehicles off the road.

Rental Car Firms Taking a Wrong Turn on Recall Bill

Rental Car Firms Taking a Wrong Turn on Recall Bill

What began as a simple bill to assure that car rental companies in California provide defect-free cars to their customers has become ensnarled in a full-out campaign by those companies to kill the bill as it moves through the state’s legislature.

Toyota President and CEO Akio Toyoda testifying before the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee.

Auto Safety in the Breakdown Lane

America’s once-vigorous commitment to stopping death and injury on our roads — one of the nation’s most severe public health problems — has become dangerously weak. With the failure of auto safety legislation in the last Congress, it appears that the public and its policymakers may no longer be interested in supporting tough measures to substantially reduce bloodshed on the highways.